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Dec 3, 2011 7:06pm
Spencer Tracy, 1932
Photo by Imogen Cunningham

Spencer Tracy, 1932

Photo by Imogen Cunningham



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Dec 2, 2011 11:39pm
(photographer unknown)
"Narrow-trimmed 1/6 plate studio portrait tintype  of an endearingly serious boy, standing in front of a painted back drop,  holding a crumpled hat in one hand."
Via J. Cosmas Vintage Photography

(photographer unknown)

"Narrow-trimmed 1/6 plate studio portrait tintype of an endearingly serious boy, standing in front of a painted back drop, holding a crumpled hat in one hand."

Via J. Cosmas Vintage Photography



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Dec 2, 2011 11:26pm
Out of the Past, 1947
(stills photographer unknown)
The genius Max Goldblatt: (follow him!)
"In college I wrote a paper on this very scene. The class was Film Noir, Fall 2004, Prof. Jeanine Basinger. One of the most important classes that I ever did take.
We cut to Kathie in medium close-up: she is lit rather flatly, the  cast shadows of the fighting men dancing over her face, creating dynamic  movement within a relatively static shot.  We hold on her for three  seconds, which is longer than any of the previous shots in this  fast-paced section.  With this added lingering time on Kathie, Tourneur  wants to draw our attention to her reaction.  She seems enthralled by  the fight (which, if you’ll remember, she politely asked for when she  requested that Jeff “break his head”) and he holds on her just long  enough for us to notice that she is doing something with her hands below  the frame line.  For now, Tourneur withholds any overt depiction of  what is going on below the frame. But we’ll find out soon enough that  she’s digging out a gun.”
Via To the Maxxx

Out of the Past, 1947

(stills photographer unknown)

The genius Max Goldblatt: (follow him!)

"In college I wrote a paper on this very scene. The class was Film Noir, Fall 2004, Prof. Jeanine Basinger. One of the most important classes that I ever did take.

We cut to Kathie in medium close-up: she is lit rather flatly, the cast shadows of the fighting men dancing over her face, creating dynamic movement within a relatively static shot.  We hold on her for three seconds, which is longer than any of the previous shots in this fast-paced section.  With this added lingering time on Kathie, Tourneur wants to draw our attention to her reaction.  She seems enthralled by the fight (which, if you’ll remember, she politely asked for when she requested that Jeff “break his head”) and he holds on her just long enough for us to notice that she is doing something with her hands below the frame line.  For now, Tourneur withholds any overt depiction of what is going on below the frame. But we’ll find out soon enough that she’s digging out a gun.”

Via To the Maxxx

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Nov 30, 2011 12:07pm
Scanned from the Do-It-Yourself Monster Make-Up Handbook by Dick Smith, published by Warren Publishing Company, New York, NY, 1965.
 

"Smith pioneered the method of applying prosthetics made from foam  latex in small pieces as opposed to the standard of applying a latex  mask as one solid piece  . Smith’s technique allowed the actor to have a wide range of facial  expressions, making the makeup appear more natural. Despite initial  criticism from many professional makeup artists at the time, Smith’s  makeup techniques proved to be superior. Today, the standard of applying  prosthetics are those that Smith invented. 
Early work by Smith was seen on a short-lived syndicated supernatural  “Twilight Zone” clone TV show produced by David Suskind out of New York  in 1961 called “Way Out”,  hosted by British writer Roald Dahl. Most  memorable was a make-up of a man who had half of his face suddenly  erased by a spilled vial of photo retouching fluid that affected real  people when merely applied to their photos. In another “Way Out”  episode, a “Hunchback of Notre Dame” make-up created by Smith becomes  permanently affixed to an evil actor who then became his character and  could never remove his make-up. Smith contributed to 14 other memorable  “Way Out” episodes, and other 60’s television shows as well.
Smith was also one of the early pioneers of combining make-up with  on-set ‘practical’ special effects, starting with “The Exorcist” in  1973, and was an artistic influence of later FX make-up artists such as Rob Bottin.  Though many of Smith’s make-up effects were so well conceived as to go  undetected, Smith’s expertise gained prominence and acclaim through the  variety and ingenuity of his many effects for The Exorcist. Some of his proteges have gone on to prominent success (e.g., Rick Baker), and Smith is generally considered to be the godfather of modern-day special make-up effects.
One of Smith’s trademarks is his ability to create natural-looking effects of aging. For Marlon Brando in The Godfather,  Smith used a dental device called a “plumber” to droop the actor’s  jowls. The transformation was so real that Brando could eat at local  restaurants around the set of the film without being recognized.In his Academy Award-winning work in the Best Picture winner Amadeus, he transformed lead actor F. Murray Abraham into an elderly and crumbling old man.
In the early-mid 60s, Smith published an instructional book, entitled Dick Smith’s Do-It-Yourself Monster Make-up Handbook, a special edition of Forrest J. Ackerman’s “Famous Monsters of  Filmland” magazine series. The detailed techniques outlined in this  100-page photo-heavy magazine were a huge influence on younger make-up  artists who later revolutionized the quality of make-up in the film  industry.”
Via Wikipedia

Thank you, publiccollectors

Scanned from the Do-It-Yourself Monster Make-Up Handbook by Dick Smith, published by Warren Publishing Company, New York, NY, 1965.

 

"Smith pioneered the method of applying prosthetics made from foam latex in small pieces as opposed to the standard of applying a latex mask as one solid piece  . Smith’s technique allowed the actor to have a wide range of facial expressions, making the makeup appear more natural. Despite initial criticism from many professional makeup artists at the time, Smith’s makeup techniques proved to be superior. Today, the standard of applying prosthetics are those that Smith invented. 

Early work by Smith was seen on a short-lived syndicated supernatural “Twilight Zone” clone TV show produced by David Suskind out of New York in 1961 called “Way Out”,  hosted by British writer Roald Dahl. Most memorable was a make-up of a man who had half of his face suddenly erased by a spilled vial of photo retouching fluid that affected real people when merely applied to their photos. In another “Way Out” episode, a “Hunchback of Notre Dame” make-up created by Smith becomes permanently affixed to an evil actor who then became his character and could never remove his make-up. Smith contributed to 14 other memorable “Way Out” episodes, and other 60’s television shows as well.

Smith was also one of the early pioneers of combining make-up with on-set ‘practical’ special effects, starting with “The Exorcist” in 1973, and was an artistic influence of later FX make-up artists such as Rob Bottin. Though many of Smith’s make-up effects were so well conceived as to go undetected, Smith’s expertise gained prominence and acclaim through the variety and ingenuity of his many effects for The Exorcist. Some of his proteges have gone on to prominent success (e.g., Rick Baker), and Smith is generally considered to be the godfather of modern-day special make-up effects.

One of Smith’s trademarks is his ability to create natural-looking effects of aging. For Marlon Brando in The Godfather, Smith used a dental device called a “plumber” to droop the actor’s jowls. The transformation was so real that Brando could eat at local restaurants around the set of the film without being recognized.In his Academy Award-winning work in the Best Picture winner Amadeus, he transformed lead actor F. Murray Abraham into an elderly and crumbling old man.

In the early-mid 60s, Smith published an instructional book, entitled Dick Smith’s Do-It-Yourself Monster Make-up Handbook, a special edition of Forrest J. Ackerman’s “Famous Monsters of Filmland” magazine series. The detailed techniques outlined in this 100-page photo-heavy magazine were a huge influence on younger make-up artists who later revolutionized the quality of make-up in the film industry.”

Via Wikipedia



Thank you, publiccollectors



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Nov 28, 2011 11:28pm
Lori Field
The Little Death

Image via Art.49

Lori Field

The Little Death



Image via Art.49



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Nov 21, 2011 10:28pm
(photographer unknown)

Bela Lugosi and (probably) Bill Neff

Found via Classic Movie Monsters

(photographer unknown)

Bela Lugosi and (probably) Bill Neff



Found via Classic Movie Monsters



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Nov 17, 2011 10:01am
Germaine Krull, Publicité pour Paul Poiret, 1926 [more]
© Mnam, Centre Pompidou, Paris, 2011
from La Lettre

Thank you, billyjane

Germaine Krull, Publicité pour Paul Poiret, 1926 [more]

© Mnam, Centre Pompidou, Paris, 2011

from La Lettre



Thank you, billyjane



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Nov 16, 2011 10:19pm
(photographer unknown)
"A popular venue for the ol’ Gorilla and Girl act were the spook shows  that roamed America beginning in the 1930’s. Dr. Neff’s Madhouse of  Mystery appears to be one of the more enduring acts that thrilled  audiences with magic and a variety of ghoulish gags. Neff was based out  of Indiana and performed there well into the 1950’s."

Via Hollywood Gorilla Men

(photographer unknown)

"A popular venue for the ol’ Gorilla and Girl act were the spook shows that roamed America beginning in the 1930’s. Dr. Neff’s Madhouse of Mystery appears to be one of the more enduring acts that thrilled audiences with magic and a variety of ghoulish gags. Neff was based out of Indiana and performed there well into the 1950’s."



Via Hollywood Gorilla Men



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Nov 16, 2011 9:54pm
Bohuslän
Photo: Jon Bergman

Bohuslän

Photo: Jon Bergman



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Nov 16, 2011 9:48pm
Neko Case
Photo: Jason Creps

Neko Case

Photo: Jason Creps



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Nov 15, 2011 8:25pm
Gary Cooper, Malibu, California, 1937
Photo: Veronica Balfe, known as “Rocky” 

"Compiled of unpublished,   never-before-seen personal photographs, shot primarily by his wife   Rocky,  Gary Cooper: Enduring Style captures the cars, the mansions and ranches, the guns and gear, and of course the endless outfits for every occasion that this Hollywood icon ensconced himself in throughout the years. Whether hunting with close friend Ernest Hemingway, lounging with Cary Grant, horseback, poolside, or on the beach, on-set or after-hours, in the company of royalty or cowboys, Cooper had the perfect outfit for every occasion, embodying a type of refined masculinity rarely seen and in high demand to this day.”


Via Elizabeth Avedon

Gary Cooper, Malibu, California, 1937

Photo: Veronica Balfe, known as “Rocky”


"Compiled of unpublished, never-before-seen personal photographs, shot primarily by his wife Rocky,  Gary Cooper: Enduring Style captures the cars, the mansions and ranches, the guns and gear, and of course the endless outfits for every occasion that this Hollywood icon ensconced himself in throughout the years. Whether hunting with close friend Ernest Hemingway, lounging with Cary Grant, horseback, poolside, or on the beach, on-set or after-hours, in the company of royalty or cowboys, Cooper had the perfect outfit for every occasion, embodying a type of refined masculinity rarely seen and in high demand to this day.”



Via Elizabeth Avedon



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Nov 15, 2011 7:47pm
A young boy studying the human skull, 1948
Photographer: Nina Leen
Via LIFE

A young boy studying the human skull, 1948

Photographer: Nina Leen

Via LIFE



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Nov 15, 2011 5:08pm
Photographer: Horst P Horst

Photographer: Horst P Horst



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Nov 15, 2011 5:04pm
(photographer unknown)

(photographer unknown)



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Nov 14, 2011 12:36pm
A still frame from the Buster Keaton short The Haunted House (1921) 
Thank you Shash for the update

A still frame from the Buster Keaton short The Haunted House (1921) 

Thank you Shash for the update

(Source: agrizzlyscene)

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